write an interesting and informative profile of your interview subject. What will readers find most interesting about your subject? What might they learn from your subject’s life, experiences, and/or words?

write an interesting and informative profile of your interview subject. What will readers find most interesting about your subject? What might they learn from your subject’s life, experiences, and/or words?

I’m in English 100 and my professor wants us to interview one of our classmates. I couldn’t show up to class so I didn’t have time to interview my fellow peer. Our professor gave us a bunch of general interview questions. I can give you some basic information about the person. But in all honesty, you can make up anything about him.
1. his name is Domeneque Dean
2. Has a Daughter
3. He is 23 years old
4. He is African American
5. Born in pasadena, California
6.He has two older sisters, one older brother, and eight little brothers. five by mother, three from father, all grew up in the same house hold.
7. Attending pasadena city college
8. did not attend high school

That’s the only thing i know about him. You can make up/ add anything you want. I’m basically giving you a chance to say whatever you want about that person

Americans handling Food

I created a thesis statement and i want you to use it in a better way and if you want to switch some words around that would help
Thesis Statement: Americans should substitute homemade food for fast food because all food is processed with chemicals, it can lead to expensive health problems such as diabetes or heart disease and we really do not know what could be inside the food we buy

Capstone Final Project Part 1- Proposal

The Senior Capstone final project is an opportunity for you to demonstrate your understanding of important concepts in health sciences and relate them back to a real world problem in healthcare and public health.

Capstone Final Project Part 1- Proposal [DOWNLOAD]: You will select an issue in public health and/or select a health science topic for your Capstone Final Project. You will write a proposal that describes the basic aspects of your Capstone Project. The Capstone Proposal is the first part of the assignment that is due more immediately.You will write a proposal that describes the basic aspects of your Capstone Project. The Capstone Proposal is the first part of the assignment that is due more immediately.

Atmosphere and Clouds

View the graph in the website at http://www.antarcticglaciers.org/glaciers-and-climate/ice-cores/ice-core-basics/, the current CO2 concentration at http://keelingcurve.ucsd.edu, and the carbon cycle at http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/CarbonCycle/. Also, read the section on climate change in Chapter 11 of your textbook.

Compare current CO2 levels to the concentrations from the past 450,000 years. Based on these websites and the textbook, answer the following questions:
•Explain how the carbon cycle works.
•What is the current CO2 concentration in parts per million (ppm)?
•How does this compare to the highs or lows over the past 450,000 years?
•What are the three most abundant sources from which humans add CO2 to the atmosphere?
•Explain the two main natural carbon sinks that remove CO2 from the atmosphere.
•Explain in detail two ways deforestation contributes to the increase in CO2 levels.
•What are some other greenhouse gases, and how do their concentrations compare to the past 450,000 years?
•Based on the data, are humans contributing to climate change, or is it strictly a natural part of the cycle? Defend your answer. You must weigh all of the data, and use them to formulate your conclusion.

Your paper should meet the following requirements:
•3-4 pages in length (does not include title and reference page)
•1-2 outside sources
•Formatted according to the CSU-Global Guide to Writing and APA Requirements.

Should employers be allowed to use social media in place of employment?

Present the main idea of their respective paper and explain why your writing about this topic and what significance it has in the business and legal environment.
Below is the topic I was assigned and areas I need to discuss.
Social media influence on hiring practices
• Trend of asking potential candidates for passwords for their social media apps, such as Facebook.
• Impact on hiring practices of social media reporting companies like Reppify.
• Use of third parties in social media background checks to avoid liability claims [Third parties considered consumer reporting agencies under Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)] Age and gender differences
• Employer’ social media monitoring and the right to free speech

Manifest Destiny and the Pocahontas Complex

I need a 4 page research paper covering the attached file about manifest destiny and the pocahontas complex. It needs a compelling title and to use quotes and detailed discussion of specific scenes to support what the paper has to say. Also, you need to see Avatar and the movie The Searchers from 1956 to compare along with the attached file information.
Please no plagiarism. It is due 10/07/18. I need a 4 page research paper covering the attached file about manifest destiny and the pocahontas complex. It needs a compelling title and to use quotes and detailed discussion of specific scenes to support what the paper has to say. Also, you need to see Avatar and the movie The Searchers from 1956 to compare along with the attached file information.
Please no plagiarism. It is due 10/07/18.

Ethnographic Research Paper

Using 30 Days as your inspiration, you will have the opportunity to participate in 24 hours of intercultural participation and write about your experiences, through a daylong ethnographic experiment. When I use the word “inspiration” I mean just that. You’re not obligated to recreate the “Binge-Drinking Mom” (S1, Ep. 6) episode, for example. But you may find yourself intrigued by the “Animal Rights” episode (S3, Ep. 3) and eat as a Vegan for a day. Coming from the Greek ethnos meaning “nations” and graphia meaning “writing”, ethnography is a course of study where one learns about other cultures, by observation and, often, participation. The goal of your ethnographic experience is to engage in embodied learning. As you’ve seen in 30 Days, the participants learn the most through their embodied, lived experiences with others from another culture.
Choose a 30 Days episode we’ve not previously used or will use in our class discussions, and use that episode as the basis for your ethnographic research. Participate in a culture that you do not identify with, for a 24-hour period. In an 8-10 page paper, describe your experience, relate it to the episode, and link it to our study of intercultural communication through a well-versed discussion of class concepts. You are required to use five (5) outside sources in this paper. To engage ethnographically and write your paper, you will need to ensure that you allow yourself plenty of time to reflect and engage with the culture you’re exploring. The goal of this assignment is to have you ‘dive in’ to the material we’re studying, not ‘swim around’ it.
Please note: The goal of the assignment is for you to be a participant-observer in your research. To that end, your role is not to create disturbances or to stay in an environment where you feel unsafe.

Names, Naming Others, Identitiy and Intercultural Communication

In this assignment, you are required to explore the extent to which a person’s name is an “essential aspect in their sense of individual identity.” How do you go about naming others? What does naming others reveal about us? What is the connectedness between names, naming others and individual/personal identity? Lastly, how do names and naming others impact on effective intercultural communication and relationship?
Instructions
Your paper should:
1. Be a minimum of three (3) pages and a maximum of four (4) pages (not including the
cover page and works cited/references);
2. Be typed double-spaced, 12-point, and one-inch margin on all sides;
3. Be formatted using APA or MLA documentation style;
4. Have no less than FOUR references (citations

Mathematical Responses

All assignments must have your name, assignment number, course name, date, and it must be word format.

Essay Responses: All questions need to be answered in essay format (must be typed, doubled spaced, Times New Roman, 12 point font, with 1″ margins, and all sources must be sited).

Mathematical Responses: Students must show all the formulas and all procedures. Answers only will not be accepted, make sure to show all your work. Answers must be typed, double spaced, Times New Roman, 12 point font, with 1″ margins).

For this assignment you will need to complete the following:
Chapter 8: Questions 1 – 8, page 306

Book: Chang, C. M. (2016). Engineering Management Meeting the Global Challenges (2nd ed.). Boca Raton, FL: Taylor & Francis Group.

SCIENTIFIC METHOD AND GRAPHING

SCIENTIFIC METHOD AND

GRAPHING IN EXCEL

 I.   The Scientific Process

What is Science?

A good definition of science for biological research is the orderly process of posing and answering questions about the natural world through repeated and unbiased experiments and observations.

The way scientists evaluate ideas, information, and explanations has come to be known as the scientific method. The scientific method is a way of gaining information about the natural world by posing possible solutions to questions followed by rigorous testing to determine if the proposed solution is valid. All scientific investigations begin with an observation of a problem or pattern.

The second step is hypothesis formation. A hypothesis (hypothesis is singular, and hypotheses are plural) is a statement that provides a possible explanation for an observation. Hypotheses are always phrased as statements, not questions. A good hypothesis has two characteristics: 1) it can account for all the available data, and 2) it is testable. It is important to note that hypotheses must be falsifiable. In other words, based on the results of the data collected, a hypothesis is either retained or rejected.

Once a hypothesis is formed, predictions need to be formulated that go along with the hypothesis. A complete scientific hypothesis is composed of both the hypothesis statement and the prediction statement. Once you have an expected outcome, the next step is to test the hypothesis. A hypothesis may be tested by collecting additional observational data, or by designing and carrying out an experiment. After the data is collected and analyzed, conclusions are drawn from that data that support or refute the hypothesis.

It is important to remember that an experiment or observational study that supports a hypothesis is not inherently better than one that does not support the hypothesis. Either way our understanding of the natural world has increased.

Typical steps in the process of science are:

  • Make Observations: The scientific method starts with making a careful observation. Observations can be made from nature, or from written notes of other investigators collected in books or
  • Formulate a Hypothesis: The next step is to construct a hypothesis – use research and reasoning to derive a potential explanation for the phenomenon observed, identifying the variables.
  • Formulate a Prediction: Then, formulate a prediction. What would you expect to see if your hypothesis is supported? What if it is refuted? Predictions generally relate more closely to the design of the experiment, whereas the hypothesis relates to the overarching biological idea or theory.

 

  • Conduct and experiment and/or gather observational data: Perform an experiment or make systematic observations to test the prediction(s). Experiments need to be carefully planned to make sure the correct experimental variables are being measured (see below). Careful observation and recording of data is critical.

 

  • Analyze data: After performing the experiment or collecting observational data, you analyze the This is where statistics and graphing become an important part of biological research.

 

  • Formulate conclusion: Depending on the results, you conclude to support or reject the hypothesis you set out to test. Note: you can never “prove” your hypothesis; you can only falsify it or show support for it by testing the corresponding prediction.

 

7)   Ask another question based on what you discovered!

 

 

Exercise: Observations – Hypotheses – Predictions

Example 1: Spines

 

Observation: You visited the Sonoran desert and observe that there are some plants that have visible chewing damage from herbivores, but others that appear untouched. These untouched plants are cacti with spines.

 

Hypothesis (statement): Spines on cacti prevent animals from eating the cacti.

 

Prediction (If..then…): If cactus spines prevent herbivory, then removal of the spines will result in cacti being eaten by animals.

 

 

2  – Stinking Flowers

 

Observation: On your latest expedition to the Malayan rainforest you found a plant whose flowers were spotty and flesh-colored, stank of rotting meat and were covered in carrion beetles and flies. Obviously you approached closer and noticed that several of the insects had what appeared to be pollen grains stuck to their bodies.

 

Hypothesis: The plant is pollinated by carrion beetles and flies.

 

Prediction:

 

 

 

3  – Boyfriends / Girlfriends

 

Observation: You’ve been reading the tabloids and noticed that Paris Hilton, the super-rich hotel heiress, has had a lot of boyfriends lately. You, on the other hand, are working night shifts for minimum wage and your match.com mailbox is empty.

 

Hypothesis: Money and wealth increase attractiveness.

 

Prediction:

 

 

 

4  – Algae

 

Observation: Heavy rains in the last couple of weeks have led to sewer overflows and sewage runoffs that entered rivers and eventually Lake Michigan. Now it is finally warm and sunny, but you don’t want to use the beach because it is covered in algae and the water is contaminated with E. coli.

 

Hypothesis:

 

 

 

Prediction:

II.   Designing Experiments

An important component of the scientific method is thoughtfully planned experiments. Experiments are not as easy to conduct as you might think, and several crucial components have to be considered during the planning stage.

 

The first step is to identify the variables. A variable is anything (factor, trait or condition) that is controlled, manipulated, or measured. There are three kinds of variables: dependent, independent, and standardized.

 

  • Independent (experimental) variable: this variable is changed for the purpose of the experiment, and as the independent variable is changed, the changes in other variables are Independent variables are chosen because the experimenter thinks that they will affect the dependent variable. There may be multiple independent variables, but it is best to manipulate each one independently, so that the defect of each independent variable can be determined. Independent variables are the ones that are changed by the experimenter.

 

  • Dependent (response) variable: this is the variable that is

closely observed during the experiment to see how it responds to the change made to the independent variable. The new value of the dependent variable is caused by and depends on the value of the independent variable. Dependent variables are the ones that are observed by the experimenter.

 

  • Standardized (control) variables: these variables need to remain constant during the experiment, so that change in the dependent variable can be attributed to change in the independent variable Controlled variables need to be monitored as closely as the other variables, to be sure that they did not change. Standardized variables are the ones that are kept the same by the experimenter.

 

 

Two other factors are important to consider when planning experiments. Whenever possible, a control treatment

should be included, and there should be replicates.

 

Control treatment: This is an experiment in which the independent variable is either eliminated or set to a standard value. This allows comparison between results obtained during the control and the experimental treatments.

 

Replicates: Replicating (repeating) the experiment, and getting similar result, increases the confidence in the results of the experiment. Replicates do not have to give the exact same result each time, because a certain amount of variation in nature is normal.

 

 

III.   Hypothesis Testing & Graphing in Excel

  1. EFFECT OF PLANT HORMONES ON PLANT GROWTH

 

In this exercise you will develop hypotheses and predictions, gather data, and use Excel to analyze and display the data.

 

Background Information

Plant hormones are produced in small amounts in one part of the plant and transported into target cells in another region, where it causes a physiological response. The physiological response include cell elongation, differentiation of cells, flowering, fruit ripening etc. Some of the well-studied plant hormones include Auxin, Gibberellins, Cytokinins, Abscisic acid and Ethylene. Plant Hormones are routinely used in horticulture to regulate plant growth.

 

Experimental setup

The lab has rulers and balances available to collect data.

Each group has been provided with petri dishes containing cucumber seeds. These seeds have been treated with different concentrations of Indoleacetic acid (IAA), a naturally occurring plant auxin. (Please ask the instructor for the concentrations of IAA applied). These plates were incubated for 1 week in dark conditions.

 

 

Write two hypotheses for the experiment. Then think about which prediction(s) your hypotheses make. Write them down.

 

 

H1:……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… P1:.…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

 

H2:……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… P2:.…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

 

 

Which is the dependent variable in your experiment? ………………………………………………………………..

 

 

Which is/are the independent variable(s)? …………………………………………………………….………………

 

 

List some of the standardized variables in the experiment. …………………………………………………………

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

What are the replicates in this experiment? …………………………………………………………

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

 

 

Measure the length (in cm) of the longest root found on each cucumber seedling, and the weight (in mg) of the entire roots. Do not detach the root from the seed.

 

Table 1: Raw data for petri dish at each group. Each group should have at least five roots to weight and measure.

 

Root length (cm) Root weight (mg)

 

 

 

Calculate the average for the treatment.

(Hint: check for a quick way to calculate averages using Excel on page 8)

 

Average length of the roots for the treatment: ………………………………………………………………………

 

Average weight of the seeds for the treatment: ………………………………………………………………………

 

 

 

Table 2: Master Data Table of average root lengths and seed weights. Each table was given a different IAA concentration (written on petri dish). Copy down the class results in the table below.

 

Concentration IAA (ug/mL) Average root length (cm) Average seed weight (mg)
0
5
10
15
20
25

 

 

Now that you have collected and analyzed your data, you may want to display the data using different types of graphs.

 

 

Have you made any preliminary (anecdotal) observations about this experiment?

 

 

  1. DISPLAYING DATA USING EXCEL

 

Three common types of graphs are listed below, as well as the type of data that is best displayed by them. Using the data you just collected, you will learn how to make graphs using Excel.

 

Directions below are for Microsoft Office 2010 for Windows. Older and Mac versions will differ slightly based on the platform.

 

 

Scatterplot:

  • Values on both x- and y-axis are numerical measures, not categories
  • A scatter plot can suggest various kinds of relationships between
  • The independent variable (controlled parameter) is plotted along the horizontal (x-)axis, and the dependent variable (measured variable) is plotted along the vertical (y-)axis.
  • If no dependent variable exists, then the order of the variables on an axis does not matter, and a scatter plot will illustrate only the degree of correlation (not causation) between two variables.
  • In a scatterplot individual points are not connected directly because they are independent measures. However, by looking at the distribution of the points, or with the addition of a trend line, you can see whether there is a general correlation within the data set
  • Data in the data table does not have to be entered in a specific order

 

To make this graph, use the data from your lab group only (Table 1)!

 

  • Open a new Excel

 

  • You will need two columns: “length” and “weight”. Then, add the data for length and weight of each root you measured at your Make sure that the data for a given root is in the same row.

 

  • Mark both columns (incl. the labels)

 

  • In the “Insert” tab, look for the “Charts” selection and select “Scatter” (Scatter with only markers). This will draw a draft scatterplot that you can now modify

 

  • In the “Chart Tools” tab, select “Layout”.

 

  • In the “Chart Title” tab, select “None”; that will get rid of the chart

 

  • In the     “Legend”       tab,     select “None”.

 

  • Using the “Axis Title” tab, add an axis title to the x- and y-axis. Select the axis titles in your chart and type in the correct axis

 

  • In the “Gridline” tab, select “None” in the “Primary Horizontal Gridlines”

 

  • You may change the color of your bar by selecting them, and with a left click opening a menu that allows you to select color

 

 

Bar graph

  • Used for displaying data that has discrete values / categories (i.e., discontinuous data like ‘shoe size’ or “hair color’. In contrast, some examples of continuous data would be ‘height’ or ‘weight’).

 

 

To make this graph, use the data from Table 1 only

 

For the bar graph example, we want to show the root length data of the shortest and longest root measured at each table. In the current

example, with a low number of data points, this data is easily extracted by just looking at your data table. But if you are handling larger data sets, it is often handy to know some simple data management tricks that Excel offers. One of them is to have the program calculate the smallest (minimum) and largest (maximum) number in each column.

 

To calculate the smallest root length (or weight), select a cell underneath the relevant data column, type “=MIN()”, place the cursor between the () and select the cells in the column for which you want to extract the smallest value.

 

 

 

 

 

 

To calculate the largest root length (or weight), select a cell underneath the relevant data column, type “=MAX()”, place the cursor between the () and select the cells in the column for which you want to extract the largest value.

 

 

Once you have the values for the smallest and largest root length, you can proceed to make the bar graph….

 

  • Open a new Excel

 

  • You will need two columns; label one “shortest” and one “longest”; then add the data for the shortest and longest root your table has

 

  • Mark both columns (incl. the labels).

 

  • In the “Insert” tab, look for the “Charts” selection and select “Column” (2-D-Column – Clustered Column). This will draw a draft bar graph – you can now modify further using the same steps as described above in points 5 and

 

 

Line graph

  • A line connects each data point, such that the local change from point to point can be seen
  • A line graph is similar to a scatterplot, but observations are ordered (i.e. shown chronologically, or ordered per the levels of the independent variable). Use a line graph for continuous numerical variables, such as

 

 

To make this graph, use the combined data from your whole lab (Table 2)!

 

To assemble the master data table (and eventually the line graph), you need average length and weight data from your root samples. Again, there is a handy Excel function that will calculate the averages for you.

 

To calculate the average root length (or weight), select a cell underneath the relevant data column, type “=AVERAGE()”, place the cursor between the () and select the cells in the column for which you want to calculate the average.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once you have the average values for root length and weight for your table, you can add it to the master data table and proceed to make the line graph….

 

  • Open a new Excel

 

  • You will need two columns; label one “IAA concentration” and one “average length”; then add the data for IAA concentration and average root length per concentration Make sure that the data for a concentration is in the same row.

 

  • Mark both columns (incl. the labels).

 

  • In the “Chart” tab, look for “Scatter” and select either “Straight Marked Scatter” or “Straight Lined Scatter”. This will draw a draft XY line graph that you can now modify further using the same steps as described above in points 5 and 6 (p. 6).

 

 

****This type of graph, a line graph, is what your will use to display your data for homework for this week. See the homework assignment below.****