Nursing

Barriers and Facilitators to Health Care for Newcomers. (2016). Retrieved from:

            http://www.kidsnewtocanada.ca/care/barriers#sthash.UG0PWzBZ.dpuf

The article explains barriers and facilitators to health care for newcomers as complex eligibility to health care insurance and entitlement rules, language, literacy skills, finances, pre-arrival health care services are limited, gender, and cultural factors. Clinicians can solve these problems by identifying their immigration status and benefits each is entitled to. In addition, liaising with health care services set for newcomers.

Bias, T. K., Agarwal, P., & Fitzgerald, P. (2015). Changing Awareness of the Health Insurance

            Marketplace. American Journal of Public Health, 105S633-S636 4p.

            doi:10.2105/AJPH.2015.302844

The article stresses that, as more people are aware of health care market, the more they make use of it. Example knowledge on health insurance and its affordability increases the number of people applying for it. However, most people do not know available federal subsidies and urges for clinicians to continue with their efforts of creating awareness to grow health insurance market.

Campbell, D. T., O’Neill, B. G., Gibson, K., & Thurston, W. E. (2015). Primary healthcare needs

In addition, barriers to care among Calgary’s homeless populations. BMC Family Practice, 161

  1. Doi: 10.1186/s12875-015-0361-3

The article summarizes primary healthcare needs as homelessness making people unable to access required health services. In addition needs such as mental health, various addictions and allied health. Barriers identified include geographical, financial education, structural, and discrimination. It concludes that homeless people experience greater number of barriers compared to sheltered individuals.

Glouberman, S., &Mintzberg, H. (2001). Managing the care of health and the cure of disease

            Part I: Differentiation. Health Care Management Review, 26(1), 56-69.

Glouberman and Mintzberg (2001) argue that differentiation of four worlds is an option to managing health care and diseases. These include primarily down in clinical operation with a special focus on patients, upward management to financers of health care institutions. Inside managements to people controlling organizations and out management to stakeholders involved with the institution but are technically independent in its formal authority.

Health care in Canada: what makes us sick?. (2013). Ottawa, Ontario: Canadian Medical

Association, 2013.

In the article factors such as poverty, poor housing, poor diets, and childhood experiences are major contributors of sicknesses in people’s health. Poverty is a recurring problem causing many problems of health. People residing in aboriginal communities experience extra health problems than those living in urban areas.

Onyekere, C., Ross, S., Namba, A., Ross, J. C., & Mann, B. D. (2016). Medical Student Volunteerism Addresses Patients’ Social Needs: A Novel Approach to Patient-Centered

Care. The Ochsner Journal, 16(1), 45-49.

The article argues that social needs have a greater impact on health of people and are the main causes of illnesses. Addressing social assists in understanding disparities in health. Socioeconomic factors such as income, access to food, finances, education, proper housing, and employment contributes greatly to the health of individuals. People struggling to meet their basic needs are most likely to be diagnosed with chronic diseases and are difficult to manage.

Pedwell, T. (2013). Good health depends on wealth, new Canadian report finds. The Globe and

Mail. Retrieved from http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and Fitness/health/good-health-depends-on-wealth-new-canadian-reportfinds/article13513490/

Pedwell (2013) argues that studies done on Canadians indicate that poverty is a major contributing factor to healthy lives and long living. Good medical services are extremely expensive and only afforded by the wealthy people. Adequate wealth comes from good employments that afford to pay for good housing, medical bills, and proper diets.

Conclusion

The articles will assist health Canada to realize and manage  contributors of ill health such as poverty, poor housing, lack of employment and proper education. However, Glouberman and Mintzberg (2001) explain the four worlds of managing health care and diseases. It incorporates, management of institutions, people, and patients added with technicalities involved which are effective if utilized by healthcare institutions.

 

References:

Barriers and Facilitators to Health Care for Newcomers. (2016). Retrieved from:

http://www.kidsnewtocanada.ca/care/barriers#sthash.UG0PWzBZ.dpuf

Bias, T. K., Agarwal, P., & Fitzgerald, P. (2015). Changing Awareness of the Health Insurance

Marketplace. American Journal Of Public Health105S633-S636 4p.

doi:10.2105/AJPH.2015.302844

Campbell, D. T., O’Neill, B. G., Gibson, K., & Thurston, W. E. (2015). Primary healthcare needs

and barriers to care among Calgary’s homeless populations. BMC Family Practice161

  1. doi:10.1186/s12875-015-0361-3

Glouberman, S., &Mintzberg, H. (2001). Managing the care of health and the cure of disease

Part I: Differentiation. Health Care Management Review26(1), 56-69.

Health care in Canada : what makes us sick?. (2013). Ottawa, Ontario : Canadian Medical

Association, 2013.

Onyekere, C., Ross, S., Namba, A., Ross, J. C., & Mann, B. D. (2016). Medical Student

Volunteerism Addresses Patients’ Social Needs: A Novel Approach to Patient-Centered

Care. The Ochsner Journal16(1), 45-49.

Pedwell, T. (2013). Good health depends on wealth, new Canadian report finds. The Globe and

            Mail. Retrieved from http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and

fitness/health/good-health-depends-on-wealth-new-canadian-reportfinds/article13513490/